Acta Musicologica
(p-ISSN: 0001-6241 | e-ISSN: 2296-4339) is the official peer-reviewed journal of the International Musicological Society (IMS). It contains articles on musicological research of international importance in five different languages (English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish). The journal is published semiannually in print form by Bärenreiter. Digital full-text coverage of all issues from 1928 up to 3 years ago is provided by JSTOR. Starting in 2018, all current issues (from 2016 onward) will be available online through Project MUSE. Furthermore, Acta is indexed and abstracted by major citation indexing services and bibliographic databases, such as Thomson Reuters’s Arts & Humanities Citation Index, EBSCOhost’s Music Index, ProQuest’s Periodicals Index Online, or RILM Abstracts of Music Literature.

Associated with Acta Musicologica:

International Musicological Society   Bärenreiter   JSTOR   Project MUSE

 

Arts & Humanities Citation Index (Web of Science)   EBSCOhost Music Index   ProQuest Music Periodicals Database   RILM Abstracts of Music Literature

 

The most recent issue of Acta Musicologica is volume 89, number 1, and includes articles by Philip V. Bohlman, Michaela Krucsay, Julia Merrill, Bruno Nettl, and Xavier Serra.

IMS members automatically receive a subscription to Acta. To become a member of the IMS or renew your membership, please use the secure online web forms on the website. The annual subscription price for non-members is €108.00.

Click here to view the table of contents from the current issue. The 2017 editorial can also be viewed online for free:
“Editorial: Globalization and Its Discontents”

 

 

ACTAvism: Acta Musicologica and Doing What We Believe

As the co-editors of Acta Musicologica we receive inquiries about the range and contents of potential contributions to the IMS journal on an almost daily basis. Which disciplines and fields constitute the musicology Acta’s pages normally contain? Where do the historical and cultural borders fall? Which languages are possible? Which theories? Which scientific methods? Is there some topic to avoid? Is there an approach that might be inappropriate?